Category Archives: Exams

Teaching Ideas for Watermark by Louise Chamberlain

We piano teachers, we’re all the same. We’re love our printable resources! So for this month’s ‘Teaching Ideas’ video, I thought I’d design a student workbook to accompany the piece I’ve chosen to present to you: Louise Chamberlain’s Watermark, currently on the Grade 2 LCM Exams piano syllabus. WATERMARK BY LOUISE CHAMBERLAIN Did you know […]

sight-reading app

BEING CREATIVE WITH THE NEW ABRSM SIGHT-READING APP

  The ABRSM’s newest app – the Sight-Reading Trainer – was launched last month. Designed to help pupils ‘develop the skills to quickly spot the key features, patterns and characteristics in music before you play it’ this new sight-reading app costs £4.99 and is available on the App Store and Google Play. For that you get a […]

piano teaching blog

101 Curious Blogs – and counting!

Whoo-hoo! This is our 101st post on The Blog! To celebrate here are some of our favourite blogs that feature resources and videos. 10 TOP TIPS FOR ONCE A MAN One of the first blogs we ever published! The song Once a man fell in a well has to be one of my all-time favourites. […]

PRACTICAL IDEAS FOR MESSY PIANO PART 8

Do you have any pieces of music that live especially close to your heart? Pieces that were first learnt a while ago, maybe when you were young, that somehow you keep returning to? For me one such piece is Dr Gradus ad Parnassum from Children’s Corner Suite by Claude Debussy. I first learnt it when […]

PRACTICAL IDEAS FOR MESSY PIANO PART 7

In the Curious Community the other day we were discussing ‘demented’ 7ths.  The husband of a Curious Piano teacher had referred to a diminished 7th in this way! It wasn’t the first time I had heard this however as several years ago one of my A level students always referred to a diminished 7th as […]

PRACTICAL IDEAS FOR MESSY PIANO PART 6

I was told by Olavo Alen that, in Cuba, “music is in the air.” This was back in 2005 when I spent a wonderful three weeks there, as part of my Churchill Travelling Fellowship. Music certainly did appear to be everywhere; every bar had a band and every street seemed to have salsa emanating from […]

PRACTICAL IDEAS FOR MESSY PIANO PART 4

When I am wearing my hat as an ABRSM examiner it is not uncommon to get a whole group of pupils from the same teacher, all taking the same practical grade exam, all playing the same pieces. THE NEED FOR TAILOR-MADE TEACHING I wonder why this is the case? Whilst it might make preparation easier […]

PRACTICAL IDEAS FOR MESSY PIANO PART 3

I’ve found myself falling back into old ways a bit at the start of this term. I talked too much. I explained too much. And this meant that there wasn’t enough music making in lessons. It is so easy to slip into familiar and comfortable teaching habits especially when trying to juggle all the additional […]

THE SOCIAL HISTORY OF PIANO TEACHING – PART 5

Over recent weeks, thousands of you have been following and reading our blog series The Social History of Piano Teaching. This is the last part in our series which provides an insight into the content of private piano lessons during the 20th century. … complete with an example of how not to play the piano! THE 20TH […]

THE SOCIAL HISTORY OF PIANO TEACHING – PART 3

Last week we followed the rapid increase in the numbers of people teaching the piano during the Victorian period. The post also looked at piano lessons and the development and popularity of piano tutor books. This week we consider what emerged in an attempt to raise standards of both teachers and players. The Royal College […]